Blood vessel detection using forward scanning OCT

These images were recorded from an anesthetized rat leg using our forward-scanning OCT probe.

Arteries and veins can be distinguished by their appearance:

The images show the contrast in the optical signal for these three structures. The nerve appears as a bright signal, the artery has a thick wall with a diffuse signal from the blood in the lumen and the vein has a thin wall with a similar signal from the blood in the lumen.

A video showing this sweep can be viewed by clicking: sweep across video (AVI file)

OCT Doppler imaging clearly differentiates flowing blood from vessel walls:

In these videos the probe was held in a fixed position over a small artery. The images are a superimposition of the OCT image showing the stationary vessel wall and the Doppler image showing the moving red blood cells. After recording the flow using OCT Doppler, the artery was dilated with lidocaine. The change in the volume of blood flow can clearly be seen on the Doppler image.

A video showing the artery before lidocaine can be viewed by clicking: artery before lidocaine (AVI)

A video showing the artery after lidocaine can be viewed by clicking: artery after lidocaine (AVI)

Arteries and veins can be distinguished by the presence of pulsations:

In these videos the probe was held in a fixed position.

A video showing a pulsating artery can be viewed by clicking: pulsating artery (AVI)

A video showing a typical vein (not pulsating) can be viewed by clicking: vein (AVI)